An Evening in Jazz Age Paris - Winnetka

10/16/2016 6:00 pm
10/16/2016 9:00 pm

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Dancing in the Valley presents an Evening in Jazz Age Paris

The second in the "Dancing in the Valley" series: an informal evening focusing on the dance and music of Paris in the 1920s & 30s - that golden age depicted in Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris".

The first hour will be instruction in the basic styles of the time: the Jazz Foxtrot, the Valse Musette and the Java. Film clips from the period will figure prominently. No partner required. Beginners welcome.

The next two hours will be free dancing to recordings from the era.

We will try to evoke the spirit of the bal Musette (a working class dance hall) so French inspired attire of the era is encouraged but in no way required. Berets and "newsboy caps" (the French call them "casquettes") are a good choice.

$10 donation suggested. Feel free to bring drinks to share (soft drinks, wine, beer), sweets and savories (cheese, cracker etc.).

Made possible by the generosity of St. Martin's Episcopal Church and Vicar Gabriel Ferrer.

NOTE: The entrance is a gate facing Winnetka Ave. Go through the gate into the courtyard. The church hall will be to your left. From the Parking Lot, go to the sidewalk and walk a few yards North on Winnetka.

Location
St. Martin in the Fields Episcopal Church
7136 Winnetka Ave, Canoga Park, CA 91306

There is a large, free parking lot on site, as well as free street parking in front of the church. There are also a lot of tasty and inexpensive eateries nearby (D'Amore's Pizza across the street is nice).

Jazz Age Social Dancing ("Cocktail Dancing")

ImageIn the Jazz Age, nearly everyone danced, so they did dances almost anyone could do.

Generally, when people think about the dances of the Jazz Age (the 1920s & 30s), they bring to mind exuberant youth dances like the Charleston or Jitterbug, or the theatrical dances of Fred and Ginger.

What Fred & Ginger did was theater and spectacle, and was never intended to be an accurate representation of how ordinary folks danced. Countless examples of normal, workaday social dancing can be seen in movies of the period but not being done by exhibition dancers like Fred and Ginger. If you want to see how it was really done, look at the folks in the background or characters who are dancing to move the story along rather than to show off their skills.

The Dancing in the Valley Project

ImageI (Walter Nelson) am undertaking a new project, which is a bit of a departure.

At this moment there is no "vintage dance" in the San Fernando Valley. There's barely any Swing dancing. I will try to do a little bit to remedy that.

The "Dancing in the Valley" project will involve recurring, inexpensive, informal vintage dance gatherings here in my neighborhood.

I understand that much of Southern California regards the Valley as a sort of Siberia - a distant, strange and inaccessible land, so I have, with the generous support of the Episcopal Church of Saint-Martin-in-the-Fields and Vicar Gabriel Ferrer (son of Jose Ferrer BTW), set up a program that does not depend on huge numbers to cover the costs.

I have also chosen a time that works for the Church and also competes with very few other programs - Sunday evening 6-9 PM. For Valley residents, it is conveniently close and for those from other areas, you can brave the less-bad-than-most-times Sunday afternoon traffic, dine at one of our inexpensive local establishments, and then partake of free and convenient parking with a low-key, friendly evening of dance and socializing. It then ends in time for folks with jobs to get home and get to bed.

Each event, happening more or less once a month, will have a different theme. The first will focus on dancing in Weimar Berlin in the '20s and '30s. Future ones will mostly be Jazz Age, but I reserve the option to divert into other eras, from the Regency to Victorian to Ragtime, depending on my mood and the level of demand.

The first hour will be instruction, with the following two hours dancing to recorded music with yours truly as the DJ. If we start getting sufficient numbers, we can hire some live music.

Here's a link to the first event: http://www.walternelson.com/dr/berlin-tanzen

I hope to see you soon here, in the San Fernando Valley, my home (cue Bing Crosby).

Building Models of Civil War Ironclads

ImageI have posted this to the web to assist my friend, Steve Lund, who is one of the authors of this detailed guidebook for making working models of Civil War ironclads.

Here's the link to the PDF
http://walternelson.com/ironclads.pdf

The proper title is:
MODELING CIVIL WAR IRONCLAD SHIPS
By
Steven Lund and William Hathaway
Copyright 2007

Cutting In to the Dance - 1930

ImageEditor's note: I post this to address questions I have received from time to time about the topic. Unlike much of what I post, I do not advocate its return. I think this a bad custom, and am delighted that it has fallen into disuse. The annoyance of having an already brief dance cut short, its tendency to add further evidence of popularity to a few and lack of it to many more, and the fact that the lady has no option of refusing make it entirely obnoxious. However, for purposes of education here it is.

From "Modern Ballroom Dancing" by Lillian Ray, 1930.

Cutting In

Program dances have gone out almost entirely. Cutting in during dances has become a recognized practice. The man who wishes to cut in taps the girl's partner on the shoulder quietly. The dancer must relinquish his partner courteously and cheerfully. The girl has no choice in the matter.

The custom has its drawbacks as it is often annoying to leave a partner whom you particularly like, to dance with one for whom you may not care in the least. However, it is not good form to refuse to dance with a man who cuts in. Nor can the first partner of the girl cut in on the man who took her from him. He can cut in on her next partner though. A man must not continue to cut in on the same man when he dances with another partner. For example if John Bart cuts in on Harry Gray when the latter is dancing with Janet Stone, John cannot cut in on Harry when he dances with Helen Barclay. If he did so, Harry would think, and rightly, that John was deliberately trying to spoil his evening and take all his partners from him.

From "Bernice Bobs Her Hair" by F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1920

No matter how beautiful or brilliant a girl may be, the reputation of not being frequently cut in on makes her position at a dance unfortunate. Perhaps boys prefer her company to that of the butterflies with whom they dance a dozen times an evening, but youth in this jazz-nourished generation is temperamentally restless, and the idea of fox-trotting more than one full fox trot with the same girl is distasteful, not to say odious. When it comes to several dances and the intermissions between she can be quite sure that a young man, once relieved, will never tread on her wayward toes again.

Collegiate Steps - Modern Ballroom Dancing 1930

ImageExtracted verbatim from "Modern Ballroom Dancing" by Lillian Ray. Franklin Publishing Company, 1930.

COLLEGIATE STEPS

No MODERN book on ballroom dancing would be complete without including a few Collegiate Steps for the younger generation. These hopping and jumping steps are lively if not dignified. They reflect the brisk tempo of young America. They will be seen more often at fraternity dances and Village night clubs than in the ballrooms of the more pretentious and formal hotels and country clubs. But these Collegiate Steps are too much a part of present day dancing to be shunned as stepchildren.

All the steps detailed in the following pages should be danced with plenty of pep and abandon. They are, after all, to be used in a spirit of fun. Even the starting position for the Collegiate Steps is less formal than that for the older and more dignified dances. The collegiates affect a crooked elbow and a closer hold than their elders. Figure shows the position for the Collegiate Walk, which is similar to the Fox Trot but sharper and snappier.

Argentine Tango - Then and Now

ImageOne of my pet peeves in trying to recreate the dances of the Jazz Age is our tendency to extrapolate how we dance today into the past: to say "I know the Foxtrot, so this must be how it was done in 1930" or to say "The Tango is eternal and never changing".

I want to be clear that I am not condemning current dance styles. They are a reflection of our current interests and sensibilities - just as the dances of the Jazz Age reflected that era's very different interests and sensibilities. Societies evolve and dances evolve with them, and all that I ask is that we try not to superimpose our current view of things on the past.

I am using the Argentine Tango as an illustration of my point, but the same evolution has occurred with the other current ballroom dances: the Foxtrot, Waltz and Quickstep.

One of the biggest differences between then and now is our current blending of theatrical "exhibition dancing" and social dancing - current social dancing tends to be an almost apologetically watered down version of the exhibition style, but containing as many fancy moves as one can muster.

Back in the day, social dancing was a simpler affair, with a focus on partner interaction and very little on outward display, and exhibition dancing was a distinctly different style with a completely different purpose.

Which is why I find the first clip so interesting. Carlos Gardel (the King of the Tango) is dancing and everyone stops dancing to watch - not because Carlos and his partner are so flashy and spectacular, but because their dance has a level of focus and precision that the audience understands and appreciates. Note the total lack of kicks.

This is followed by current Argentine Tango as danced on the streets of Buenos Aires - admittedly theatrical since they are putting on a show, but still very much what most people today expect to see when they see a Tango - and feel like they're not quite getting it right if they don't dance it this way.

This is then followed by "The Argentine Tango": a 1930s exhibition Tango such as you would see in a night club.

It's probably not necessary to watch each of the clips all the way through to get the gist of what I'm talking about.

The Argentine Waltz - 1935

One of the things that fascinates me about the dances of the Jazz Age is how universal and international the "Modern Dance" sensibility was. Pretty much anywhere you were, from New York to London to Berlin to Buenos Aires the dances were very similar.

Paris and Vienna had some unique takes on the Waltz, but in Argentina, the close-hold, box-step smooth style found in most of the world was also found there, in the home of the Tango. There is today a style of Waltz popular with the Tango crowd that is essentially a Tango in 3/4 time. That doesn't seem to be what's happening here, though to be fair, the Argentine Tango of 1935 was not quite what you generally see danced today either.

Just for contrast, I have also embedded a video of the modern take on the Argentine Waltz.

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